How 3D Saves Time & Money

How 3D Saves Time & Money

An average of $6-8 billion are spent on physical samples in the apparel industry. Coupled with the traditional workflow means that it can take months for brands to receive a first, physical prototype from the initial design sketch.

We’ve already discussed 5 ways how 3D technology can save time and money for the apparel industry, but how can companies implement and see true ROI on their investments?

In a recent survey, we saw that companies were able to save millions, with an average of 10-15% reduction in sample making costs. What’s more, 3D technology reduced physical samples by 50% as designers could work together in real time to implement immediate product changes.

The real game changer with 3D, is producing a digital sample where there is a 95% similarity in appearance to the physical sample. Photorealistic rendering, advanced fabric and texture properties, and the ability to easily embed rigid parts such as buttons and trims, allow decision makers to see how a garment will act and look – without needing to touch a physical sample.

“With this technology, we can take a blazer and mock up 20 pieces of art in five minutes if we need to,” says Sandra Gagnon, Target’s senior group manager of NIT and 3-D virtual product development. “Once you have those 3-D garments created, virtually putting them into the floor plan, recoloring them, seeing how they look in your lighting, it really helps to make a decision.”

3D Infographic

Click to enlarge

Want to learn more? Download our Ebook to see more tips to reduce costs, increase time to market, save fabric, produce less physical samples, all while innovating and staying creative.

Dana Soffer

Dana Soffer

Director, Corporate Marketing
Dana has over 15 years experience in international marketing and communications for leading global B2B and B2C companies. She currently develops and executives corporate marketing communication strategies, builds brand identity and manages public relation efforts. Dana has a BA in Human Behavior & Marketing from Colman College of Management.
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